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How To Buy A Good Duvet



  • It's difficult to tell quality without seeing a duvet or comforter. Still, certain tell-tale signs are thread count (at least 300), good outer shell material, good inner fill material, and the stitching type (baffle box is best). If you are looking at the bedding in person, feel the material and its loft and look to make sure the stitching is even and there are no loose threads. When shopping online, look at customer reviews of the product (if it has many reviews) to help you form an opinion. Scattered or piecemeal customer feedback is less helpful."}},"@type": "Question","name": "How do you choose a duvet cover size?","acceptedAnswer": "@type": "Answer","text": "Measure your duvet insert (comforter or duvet) dimensions. Determine if you prefer a duvet with a snug, more close fit or a loose, airy quality. If you want a snugger fit, you should purchase a comforter or duvet that is bigger than your duvet cover by two inches in length and width. For a loose, fluffy bed covering, undercut the dimensions by about two inches. Also, ensure your duvet and cover have interior fasteners so the insert doesn't swim around inside the cover.","@type": "Question","name": "Should I go up a size in the duvet or comforter?","acceptedAnswer": "@type": "Answer","text": "In many cases, you should get a duvet that matches the size of your mattress. The few exceptions include very deep mattresses, particularly adjustable mattresses or mattresses that go over 12 to 18 inches, and beds with thick feather or foam mattress toppers. Also, some people prefer that the duvet covers the box spring on either side. So, take measurements to determine your coverage needs. Sizing up may also be a practical preference if you share a bed and often play tug of war with the covers.","@type": "Question","name": "How does a quilt differ from a duvet or comforter?","acceptedAnswer": "@type": "Answer","text": "A quilt is similar to a comforter or duvet but much thinner with an inner layer of batting. Comforters and duvets often use thicker layers of down or down alternatives and are usually warmer. All are constructed comparably since they use quilt-like stitching with front and back panels sewn together with a layer of fill inside."]}]}] .icon-garden-review-1fill:#b1dede.icon-garden-review-2fill:none;stroke:#01727a;stroke-linecap:round;stroke-linejoin:round > buttonbuttonThe Spruce The Spruce's Instagram The Spruce's TikTok The Spruce's Pinterest The Spruce's Facebook NewslettersClose search formOpen search formSearch DecorRoom Design

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Get daily tips and tricks for making your best home.Subscribe The Spruce's Instagram The Spruce's TikTok The Spruce's Pinterest The Spruce's Facebook About UsNewsletterPress and MediaContact UsEditorial GuidelinesHome Design & DecoratingRoom DesignBedroomsWhat Is a Duvet? Choosing a Duvet or Comforter Buying Considerations and How to Find the Best Bedding




how to buy a good duvet



It's difficult to tell quality without seeing a duvet or comforter. Still, certain tell-tale signs are thread count (at least 300), good outer shell material, good inner fill material, and the stitching type (baffle box is best). If you are looking at the bedding in person, feel the material and its loft and look to make sure the stitching is even and there are no loose threads. When shopping online, look at customer reviews of the product (if it has many reviews) to help you form an opinion. Scattered or piecemeal customer feedback is less helpful.


Measure your duvet insert (comforter or duvet) dimensions. Determine if you prefer a duvet with a snug, more close fit or a loose, airy quality. If you want a snugger fit, you should purchase a comforter or duvet that is bigger than your duvet cover by two inches in length and width. For a loose, fluffy bed covering, undercut the dimensions by about two inches. Also, ensure your duvet and cover have interior fasteners so the insert doesn't swim around inside the cover.


In many cases, you should get a duvet that matches the size of your mattress. The few exceptions include very deep mattresses, particularly adjustable mattresses or mattresses that go over 12 to 18 inches, and beds with thick feather or foam mattress toppers. Also, some people prefer that the duvet covers the box spring on either side. So, take measurements to determine your coverage needs. Sizing up may also be a practical preference if you share a bed and often play tug of war with the covers.


A quilt is similar to a comforter or duvet but much thinner with an inner layer of batting. Comforters and duvets often use thicker layers of down or down alternatives and are usually warmer. All are constructed comparably since they use quilt-like stitching with front and back panels sewn together with a layer of fill inside.


Silk and bamboo filled duvets are 100% hypoallergenic, which makes them ideal for people with sensitive skin and allergies. These natural fibers are excellent insulators and excel at wicking away moisture to keep sleepers cool and dry. This also makes them a good choice for warmer sleepers.


Wool fill can wick up to a third of its weight in moisture! This helps maintain a fresh, dry sleep environment. Wool is also considered a sustainable textile, as it comes from an animal-friendly, renewable resource. Slightly weightier and more dense, wool makes for a good year round or winter duvet.


Fill type is just one part of the equation. Fill power is the second part! Together, fill type and fill power determine the weight and warmth of your duvet. So what is fill power? Simply put, it refers to the volume of filling in your duvet.


Quick tip: To increase the longevity and effectiveness of your down duvet, avoid weighing it down with heavy layers or by constantly sitting on top of it. This compresses the down, reducing its ability to loft over time.


Overall, choosing the perfect duvet is about your comfort and your needs. Start by figuring out what warmth is best for you, then narrow down your choice by taking into consideration factors like filling, ticking, and construction.


The tog rating ranges from 1 tog to 15 tog, 1 being the lightest and 15 the warmest. This usually applies to bedding such as duvets. For summer, between 1 to 7 is good, but 10.5 and above is recommended for winter.


Our best duvet buying guide covers the 10 most important things to think about when buying a duvet: duvet tog rating, duvet filling, fill power & weight, how the duvet is made and the environmental impact. Plus, duvet sizes, anti-allergy bedding, accreditations to look for, packaging and how to care for your duvets. Click here to read what customers say about duvets.


The Tog rating scale starts at a cool 1.5 tog to a very toasty 15 tog. It shows how good a duvet is at trapping air and providing warmth. Essentially, the higher the tog rating, the warmer the duvet. So, what is the best type of duvet to buy? You will most likely not want to sleep under the same tog duvet all year round.


Generally, you sleep best if your body remains at a cool to normal temperature throughout the night. 18C / 65F is about the right temperature to keep your bedroom. You will also sleep better if your duvet is the right tog for that season:


ALL SEASONS DUVETS - Also called a 3-in-1 duvet, consisting of two duvets of different togs that can be used separately or fastened together to make up a warmer duvet. Usually one duvet is a lower tog summer duvet and the other is a higher tog autumn duvet.


All our duvets have buttonholes for easy duvet pairing and can be fixed together with cufflink style fasteners. If you lose one of your duvet fasteners, just get in touch at sleep@scooms.com and we will send you a replacement pack of duvet fasteners.


Buying an all season duvet is generally a more cost effective option as buying the two duvets together will be cheaper than buying them separately. Make sure the all seasons duvet comes with a handy storage bag so that you can easily pack the extra duvet away when you're not using it.


Which duvet filling is best? The duvet filling is what makes a duvet feel totally amazing or utterly awful! Good quality duvets will have good quality fillings. There are two main types of duvet filling to choose from, natural or synthetic. The duvet casing is also important. We would always recommend a cotton casing as it is breathable, temperature regulating and sweat wicking. Read our duvet filling guide:


Natural fillings are soft, warm, fluffy and more breathable than synthetic materials. There is no need to fret over duvet hygiene and care, the majority of natural fillings are machine washable, durable and biodegradable. 041b061a72


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